The Rundown

Ohio Redistricting Commission members removed from congressional lawsuit

By: - December 8, 2021 12:10 am

The Republican majority members of the Ohio Redistricting Commission. Top row from left, Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine and Secretary of State Frank LaRose. Bottom row from left Ohio Auditor Keith Faber, House Speaker Bob Cupp, and Senate President Matt Huffman. Official photos.

Members of the Ohio Redistricting Commission have been removed from lawsuits challenging the congressional redistricting map in Ohio by the state’s supreme court, though some still remain named in the complaints in other capacities.

Gov. Mike DeWine, Secretary of State Frank LaRose, Auditor Keith Faber, state Sen. Vernon Sykes, House Minority Leader Emilia Sykes, Senate President Matt Huffman and House Speaker Bob Cupp were dismissed from the case in their capacities as commission members in a lawsuit filed by the League of Women Voters of Ohio.

However, LaRose is still named in the lawsuit in his position as state secretary of state, and Cupp and Huffman are both still named in their legislative leadership roles.

The same ruling was made by the Ohio Supreme Court in the other state-level lawsuit against the congressional maps, which was filed by the National Redistricting Action Fund on behalf of a dozen Ohio residents.

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Susan Tebben
Susan Tebben

Susan Tebben is an award-winning journalist with a decade of experience covering Ohio news, including courts and crime, Appalachian social issues, government, education, diversity and culture. She has worked for The Newark Advocate, The Glasgow Daily Times, The Athens Messenger, and WOUB Public Media. She has also had work featured on National Public Radio.

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